Learn how you can protect your child from hepatitis

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently issued an alert after a number of children experienced unusual cases of hepatitis. Hepatitis, or inflammation of the liver, is most commonly caused by hepatitis A, hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses. However, in these cases, hepatitis A, B and C were ruled out as the cause. The CDC is exploring a possible link to adenovirus type 41, which is a virus that typically causes stomach flu symptoms in children.

While hepatitis in children remains rare, learn more about the condition including signs to watch for, from Norberto Rodriguez-Báez, M.D., Gastroenterologist at Children's Health℠ and Professor of Pediatrics at UT Southwestern.

About hepatitis.

What to know about a rise in hepatitis cases in children

In April 2022, the CDC issued a health alert about unusual cases of hepatitis in children. In these cases, hepatitis A, B and C were ruled out as the cause. These hepatitis infections may be linked to an adenovirus (adenovirus 41), which is a virus that typically causes stomach flu symptoms such as diarrhea, vomiting and fever. 

Currently, known cases in the U.S. remain low. If you are concerned about symptoms of hepatitis in your child, contact your pediatrician. 

Learn how to protect your child.