and celebrates the beauty of the dyslexic mind

This past December, a group of parents got together and made an invisible disability, visible.  North Texas Dyslexia held its first annual group dyslexia art show.  There was only one requirement.  All artist submitting their work had to have dyslexia.

Dyslexia is frustrating for both parents and children when in an educational setting.  So much anger, tears, and a feeling of being alone.

This group art show, however, celebrated the amazingly creative side of dyslexia, and showed their community a different perspective at one of the most common, yet under-identified, learning differences.  

“I’m dyslexic, as are both of my daughters.  My girls are always creating and inventing things.  This show has been a dream of mine for a few years.  I wanted to show our community what dyslexics have to offer.  Not our struggles or weaknesses, but to really celebrate the beauty of the dyslexic mind.” Chontae Feldman

Dyslexia affects 1 in 5 people, yet most people really don’t understand or know what it is.

“Dyslexic children and adults struggle to read fluently, spell words correctly and learn a second language, among other challenges. But these difficulties have no connection to their overall intelligence. In fact, dyslexia is an unexpected difficulty in reading in an individual who has the intelligence to be a much better reader. While people with dyslexia are slow readers, they often, paradoxically, are very fast and creative thinkers with strong reasoning abilities.” -The Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity

But that’s changing.  North Texas Dyslexia is bringing together families and adults that have dyslexia and is raising awareness for a disorder that can’t be seen.

 

Not only did this event show how creative and talented this group of people are, but it also gave back to the community.  They were able to raise $370 for local foundations, as well as collected non-perishable food items for The Red Door Pantry.

“There were several “am I hearing you right” moments that got us here. As Ethan’s mother, I was told he was a miniature felon, lazy, defiant, and my problem. I was told he was brilliant, full of heart, solving the unsolvable and my angel. How can one child be defined differently by so many professionals? I look into my adopted boy’s eyes and see his soul. I see a rule breaker who won’t be defined by social confines. I see obstacles that I am willing to walk hand in hand with him to conquer hurdles, I see a boy who’s brilliant mind has no boundaries. When Chontae began directing the Dyslexia Art Show idea, I leaped at the chance to help produce it. I leaped at the chance to find a child or adult to break out of their social box and explode into a scene where they are celebrated, admired, and can build a community where children and adults can create, explore and build relationships. To quote an artist “I’m not disabled but of an able mind”. Our goal is to redefine dyslexia“ Lindy Jones

The first show, Discover Dyslexia Through Art, was held at The COVE in McKinney.  They had 57 submissions from 32 artists.  

If you missed it, don’t worry. North Texas Dyslexia is having their second group art show on October 4-6.

To stay up to date with information for the upcoming show, or to enter, follow North Texas Dyslexia on Facebook.

Please see the link for images from the show: 321 N. Central Expressway Ste 101
located inside the Prosperity Bank Building on the first floor. Pick up times are 9:00am - 4:00pm.https://photos.app.goo.gl/ZGP6A4UgcHA4mm119